CareerLauncher | Departmental Offices of Loreum Ipsum

 

Appointment Types

 My Appointment Type is ... Career-Conditional or Career

After three years of substantially continuous service, a career-conditional appointment leads to a career appointment.
Career and career-conditional employees are typically eligible for federal insurance and other benefits. However, the terms and conditions of each appointment, as well as the individual’s work schedule, will determine benefits eligibility.

 My Appointment Type is ... Excepted

Excepted appointments are exempt by law, regulation or Executive Order from the competitive service and, thus, are in the excepted service. These positions are generally grouped under three "schedules":

  • Schedule A is for positions for which it is not practical to hold competitive examinations, such as attorney, dentist, chaplain, and pre-approved, agency-specific positions. These are also reserved for critical hiring needs and for appointment of severely disabled individuals.
  • Schedule B positions include appointments through the Federal Career Intern Program (FCIP), federal fellowships, student internships, and bank examiners.
  • Schedule C positions are of a policy-determining nature or involve a close personal relationship between the incumbent and an agency's head or key officials. They are almost always political appointments.

Some agencies –such as the Central Intelligence Agency, Government Accountability Office, and U.S. Postal Service –are staffed entirely through excepted service appointments. These agencies have their own hiring systems, with criteria and processes that are often comparable to those used for the competitive service.

Excepted appointments can be permanent, temporary, or time-limited. Employees appointed to a permanent excepted appointment typically must complete a one-year trial period.

Excepted employees may be eligible for federal insurance and other benefits. However, the terms and conditions of each appointment, as well as the individual's work schedule, will determine benefits eligibility.

 My Appointment Type is ... Temporary

A temporary position is not expected to last more than one year. If justified, a temporary appointment may be extended for up to one additional year.

Temporary employees receive a full salary based on the grade and step of the position. Temporary employees may also receive annual pay adjustments and overtime pay. They may earn annual and sick leave if they work a full-time or part-time schedule (pro-rated if part-time).

After completing one year of continuous employment, temporary employees may become eligible for health insurance benefits. Once eligible, they must pay the entire cost of the insurance premium. The terms and conditions of each appointment, as well as the individual’s work schedule, will determine eligibility for these and other benefits.

 My Appointment Type is ... Term

​Term appointments are made for a period of more than one year and may be extended up to 4 years. Typically, term appointments are selected for projects or other non-permanent work. There may be a need to address an unusually large workload or provide staffing during a reorganization.

Term employees are not eligible for promotions. The first year of service is considered a trial period.

Term employees may be eligible for within-grade increases, retirement coverage, and health and life insurance. The terms and conditions of each appointment, as well as the individual’s work schedule, will determine eligibility for these and other benefits.

Introduction

You are hired - or "appointed" - into a government job. There are different types of appointments. Your appointment type matters, because it can impact your pay, benefits​, advancement opportunities and employee rights.


Career-Conditional & Career

Career-Conditional appointments are in the competitive service, which most federal employees are covered. Typically, for the first year, the employee serves a probationary period. After three years of substantially continuous service, a career-conditional appointment leads to a career appointment. Most new employees are given a career-conditional appointment.

​Excepted Appointments

Excepted appointments are excepted from the competitive service. These positions are placed in one of three schedules - A, B, or C. For Schedule A positions (such as attorneys, dentists, and chaplains) and Schedule B positions (such as student, career internships, and bank examiners), it may be impractical to hold competitive examinations (that is, through a competitive process that is open to the general public). Schedule C appointments are typically of a policy-determining nature and, almost always, political appointments.

Excepted appointments can be permanent, temporary, or time-limited. Employees appointed to a permanent excepted appointment typically must complete a one-year trial period.

Some agencies are staffed entirely through excepted service positions. These agencies have their own hiring systems.

Temporary & Term Appointments

Temporary appointments are made for periods not expected to last more than one year. These appointments may be extended for up to one additional year. A temporary employee does not serve a probationary period.

Term appointments are made for work that will last for more than one year but not more than four years. The first year of service is considered a trial period.

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